Drivers in New York and across the U.S. are distracting themselves behind the wheel, even when they know it is wrong. Moreover, they tend to criticize others for the same reckless behavior they themselves engage in. This was the conclusion of Root Insurance’s second annual distracted driving study.

For 47 percent of drivers surveyed, distracted driving was a top concern on the road. Ninety-nine percent acknowledged phone use as among the top three driver distractions. Yet respondents were found to use their phones for an average of 13 minutes a day behind the wheel. Nearly two in five drivers never put down their phones when they see police around.

The most common sources of phone-related distraction were group chats, video streaming, and social media like memes and news feeds. At the same time, respondents showed an intolerance of distracted driving in others. Eighty-nine percent said they would give a bad rating to Uber or Lyft drivers who texted while driving. Ninety percent considered themselves better drivers than rideshare workers.

The 2019 Focused Driving Report, also from Root Insurance, found that Generation Z drivers (those aged 18 to 24) use their phones around 20 times per 100 miles traveled. One solution to distracted driving, the company believes, is to provide incentives to drivers who avoid phone use.

With the rise in smartphones and in-car technology, though, distracted driving will continue to be an issue. When distracted drivers cause motor vehicle accidents, the victims may be able to file a claim and be compensated for their losses, including medical bills, lost wages, and vehicle repair costs. They may want to have a lawyer’s assistance in doing so.